2014-01-10 / From The Garden

FROM THE GARDEN

New Year, New Garden
By Cynthia Gibson


Bridal Pink, a Hybrid Tea Rose cultivated by Eugene Boerner in 1967. Roses should be planted after all danger of a hard frost is past. Bridal Pink, a Hybrid Tea Rose cultivated by Eugene Boerner in 1967. Roses should be planted after all danger of a hard frost is past. Once I had handed out the last of the jam and the candied orange rinds and took down the Christmas tree, it was time to reflect on what went well in the garden in 2013 and what did not.

After taking the time to reflect, I realized that one can never have enough cutting flowers. Along with that thought, my second realization was that more raspberry plants are always welcome, regardless of thorns.

Fertilizing plants more regularly is on my list for 2014. A good fertilizing schedule gives you more “flower power.” Going forward, nourishing the perennial beds with a light treatment every three weeks is my goal. I strongly suggest this program. You cannot go wrong with Miracle-Gro or Peter’s Fertilizer.

A large calendar is perfect for planning what your garden needs. You can organize your pruning, fertilizing, transplanting, mulching, weeding, seeding, and spraying schedules in one place while saving yourself the frustration of misplacing reminders on small bits of paper. Organization is a key word for gardening. You really do need schedules. Starting your seeds indoors at the proper time is crucial; similarly, you should know the best time to transplant delicate seedlings.


Cynthia Gibson is a gardener, food writer and painter. She gardens and tends her miniature orchard Cynthia Gibson is a gardener, food writer and painter. She gardens and tends her miniature orchard In two weeks, this year’s seed, plant, fruit and tree catalogues will start pouring through your mail slot. Dog-ear or place sticky notes on the pages featuring your favorite new plants. The new perennials and vegetables for 2014 are spectacular, so be sure to have a look.

Roses from David Austin are truly worth their weight in gold. He has been breeding English roses for years. His 2014 offerings showcase many beautiful selections, including:

Tranquillity: the opening buds are lightly brushed with red and yellow, but as the flowers open, the petals show pure white. The growth is upright, making it an excellent garden shrub. The foliage is almost completely thornless. Approximately 110 petals per flower.

Royal Jubilee: with a velvety shade of deep pink and repeatflowering qualities, this rose has very few thorns and has approximately 35 petals per flower.

The Lark Ascending: this breed boasts a warm apricot hue that softens over time. It is a good choice for a mixed perennial border or to feature among flowering shrubs where its tall airy growth melds beautifully with other plants. Approximately 22 petals per flower.

Heathcliff: deep crimson coloring with approximately 105 petals per flower.

Boscobel: rich salmon coloring that changes with age to a rich, deep pink. Approximately 78 petals per flower.

The perfect place to purchase your dahlias for the new year is from Swan Island Dahlias out of Oregon, the largest grower in the United States. They have new introductions for 2014 in all sizes, from dinner plate eight- to 10-inch blooms to 12-inch plants with one-inch blooms. “Charlotte Mae” is an outstanding variety, as is “Dragonberry.”

Introductions always sell out early, simply because they are new. Put in your orders early. The same goes for the season’s new fruit trees.

The vegetable world consistently surprises us with new healthy options. We can always count on Burpee to hybridize seeds for improved variations on our usual staples, and 2014 does not disappoint. The company’s new “Beef Steakhouse” tomato is the size of a small watermelon. It is huge, with one tomato able to feed a family of four! It is also touting a new white corn called “Amaize.” You’ll enjoy its juicy crunch and super sweet taste. Burpee’s newest beet is named “Moulin Rouge,” a very flavorful variety.

January is just the beginning of what can be a fun year of finding new and delicious varieties to grow and enjoy. Happy gardening in 2014.

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